A Framework That Provides Clarity

During periods of “low visibility,” confusion reigns: for every indication of one trend, there seems to be a countertrend. The key is to glean from the collective wisdom of reliable leading indicators a clear signal that the economy is headed for a turn.

About Business Cycles

What is a Business Cycle?

Business cycles - alternating periods of recession and recovery - are part and parcel of all free-market economies.

  • Business cycles are a type of fluctuation in aggregate economic activity in market-oriented economies.
  • They consist of simultaneous expansions in many economic activities, followed by similarly general recessions.
  • This sequence of changes is recurrent but not periodic –a business cycle can last from a year to more than a decade.
  • A business cycle cannot be divided into shorter cycles of similar character and magnitude.

Growth rate cycles – alternating periods of accelerating and decelerating economic growth – occur within business cycles. Growth rate cycle downturns can culminate in either recessions or soft landings that are followed by a reacceleration in economic growth. These cycles are especially relevant to cyclical fluctuations in securities markets.

The Durability of the Cycle

During long periods of economic expansion, conviction inevitably grows that the business cycle is “obsolete,” because the economy has entered a “new era.” In the last century, this happened in the U.S. during the Roaring Twenties, the late 1960s, as well as the late 1990s. The recessions that followed dispelled such delusions - for a time.

As Japan and Europe recovered from the devastation of World War II in the decades that followed, growth was so rapid that recessions were few and far between, fostering the mistaken belief that U.S.-style recessions could not occur in those economies. As growth slowed, old-fashioned recessions reappeared, with Japan experiencing five and Germany three recessions since the early 1990s.

Similarly, many thought that the recent global recession and recovery broke the mold of past business cycles. However, through the prism of ECRI's leading indexes, the period resembled a textbook cycle. ECRI's indexes navigated this cycle just as well as they had in the “jungle-variety” depressions and crises of the early 20th century, and in the more recent “garden-variety” recessions.

The business cycle is not going away.

For this reason, the robustness and objectivity of ECRI's analytical framework is essential to any informed decision-making process. The reality is that, as long as we have free-market economies and human nature is prone to bouts of euphoria and depression, the business cycle will endure.

ECRI History

ECRI History

Three generations of cycle research.

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This approach works like a charm.
- Forbes Magazine
Congrats on having the only coherent analysis available.
- ECRI Professional Member
ECRI has had a very stellar record. They've been making pretty bold calls and going against the conventional wisdom. So far their record has been one of the most impressive, and has been written up in the press as well as talked about in policy circles.
Nothing in the world compares with ECRI’s insights into the business cycle. Those insights form a key part of our strategic and tactical management of asset class allocations. We have never been disappointed in following what ECRI’s indicators suggest is likely to occur next.
- ECRI Professional Member
I find that ECRI’s historical knowledge of economic cycles and data is almost as important to me as your indicators of future cycles.
- ECRI Professional Member
ECRI [is] the most accurate forecasting institution in the world.
- Sydney Morning Herald

Our Track Record

ECRI Services

Highlights of ECRI's calls.

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